If you’re a gun enthusiast, you may be planning to build your own Polymer80 pistol in your home. That’s a fantastic thing to do, especially if you’re adding a personal touch to your gun collection. Gun lovers often find it more fulfilling when they build their own guns. For many individuals, this comes easy because of the wide availability of materials needed for the pistol building. However, please be reminded that the possession of polymer frames, if sourced from a legitimate and certified manufacturer, is legal.

Polymer80 refers to a gun that’s not yet complete. In most cases, gun stores sell this product in jigs or kits. The buyer, who’s usually a gun enthusiast, is the one who assembles the pistol frame. If you’re excited to learn the basics on how to build a topnotch Polymer80 pistol, here’s a guide that may help you:

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What Is Polymer80?

Basically, Polymer80 refers to pistol bodies that are about 80% complete. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives does not require a background check for this product. In addition, it does not serialize Polymer80s because these frames are only considered receiver blanks. However, in some states like California and New York, the production and shipment of receiver blanks are either banned or restricted.

Usually, gun enthusiasts order the jigs of Polymer80s from online firearm stores. These kits have the needed bits, pins, frames, and other materials that gun enthusiasts could freely use or modify. After assembling, the gun lover may try to apply a coating to make the frame more personal. If you’re looking to customize your Polymer80, you may go to the websites that offer Cerakote services. You may also add grip accessories or other add-ons.

Frame Types

Polymer80 frames are some of the most sought conversion gun kits in the market today. The following are some of the common frames that you could find in your favorite gun shop:

Gun enthusiasts and Polymer80 builders generally classify polymer frames into the following:

  • Glock 17 size frame with a Glock 34 slide
  • The popular Glock 19 size frame with polymer80s bag well
  • Glock 26 size frame for subcompact gun enthusiasts
  • Glock 17 size frame with a Glock 34 slide
  • The popular Glock 19 size frame with polymer80s bag well
  • Glock 26 size frame for subcompact gun enthusiasts

Tools Needed

The following tools are ideal for drilling the pinholes and removing the unnecessary parts of the frame. However, you may use other alternatives you’re comfortable with.

  • Four-inch benchtop vise: Handheld drill or drill press and bits
  • End-cutting Nipper
  • Utility Blade
  • Packing Tape
  • Jigs (refers to the Polymer80 kit that contains the pistol barrel/frame, end mill bits, plastic or metal plates, and bolts)
  • Four-inch benchtop vise: Handheld drill or drill press and bits
  • End-cutting Nipper
  • Utility Blade
  • Packing Tape
  • Jigs (refers to the Polymer80 kit that contains the pistol barrel/frame, end mill bits, plastic or metal plates, and bolts)
A Handy Guide To The Polymer80 Pistol

Steps In Building A Polymer80 Pistol

1. You may use a four-inch bench top vise to hold the jig. This vise is heavy and robust enough to hold the jig properly even if lots of force and drilling are involved.
2. Secure the frame by using packing tape.
3. Pin the holes and rail clearances that are already pre-marked. Start with using the regular bits. Once the bits break through, drill in and out repeatedly until each hole has cleaned up.
4. Be cautious in pinning the holes. It requires focus and practice as a lack of control may damage the other side of the frame.
5. Put the jig vertically on the spines. Let the force from the vise keep it in place.
6. Gently tighten the nipper on the top part of the tab. Then, slide down to the bottom of the tab. Squeeze the tool hard enough until you pop the top part of the tab.
7. Press your off-hand on the jig while using your dominant hand for adjusting the blade on the jig.
8. Slide down to the bottom of the tab. Ensure that you’ve lined up the nipper along the ridge. Sand the rough surface left after cutting out the top part of the tab.
9. Line the blade along the top part of the tab before cutting the remaining rough tops of the tabs. It should be perpendicular. Make sure that you’re cutting straight right along the base of the tab.
10. Trace the curves with a black marker. Remove the fill on the curved floor where the recoil spring will position. Wear eye protection as the next step will produce a lot of plastic dust.
11. Start drilling using a carving drill bit upfront, not on the side of the grip or handle, to have enough room for drilling.
12. Sand the curve floor for the recoil spring with a round file or a dowel rod with sandpaper. Others opt for a sanding drill bit.
13. Remove ridges and roughness. Sand off the excess materials until it becomes smooth.
14. Apply a finish for a better look.

Features

The recent Polymer80 frames have improved dramatically in the past years. The following are the salient features that many gun makers look for in choosing this gun frame:

  • Better ergonomics compared to factory-made Glock frames
  • The frame has relief cuts on the trigger guard. You can hold the grip high enough for added comfort.
  • Enhanced texture and 18-degree grip angle for better grip
  • Improved thumb rest where you can place your thumb comfortably while shooting
  • Attachable to any gen 3 aftermarket accessory
  • Has a trigger guard that serves as a retention spot
  • Fit for a squared-away custom holder
  • Every part is customizable
  • Can be used to practice assembling/disassembling a Glock

Wrapping Up

Polymer80s are some of the widely sought receiver blanks that gun lovers could buy and customize in most states. If you’re serious about completing a Polymer80 build, you need to have enough patience and focus. Aside from these traits, you must prepare a set of tools and accessories to obtain a beautifully crafted build. In addition, you may consider applying an extra coating to make your frame look better.

In assembling and modifying the parts, always observe safety precautions. Also, use tools appropriately. Since accessories, tools, and jigs are widely available, you may always consider efficient yet affordable products. Be wise in sourcing your jigs and other products such as the rails, locks, and pins. You could buy from aftermarkets if you find difficulties sourcing out factory-made Glock slides and other materials.